The Babylonian Invasion In Archeology – Part 2: The Lachish Letters

(Photo: James Leslie Starkey points to where he found the “Lachish Letters” in 1935.)

In speaking of the destruction of Jerusalem, it’s easy to forget that other cities in the kingdom suffered defeat and exile as well. Such was the case with Lachish, the second most important city in the kingdom of Judah.

On January 29, 1935, British archaeologist James Leslie Starkey made what is widely regarded as one of the most important discoveries in the history of Biblical archeology. Continue reading

The Babylonian Invasion In Archeology – Part 1: Jerusalem Falls

The Babylonian invasion of Judah is one of the most momentous events in the history of Israel. It resulted in the destruction of the capital Jerusalem, the exile of the population to a foreign land, the end of independent rule by kings from the house of David and most importantly, the destruction of the glorious temple built by King Solomon. There was a controversy at one time about whether the Bible exaggerated the event. Some today still might still dispute certain details, but the archaeological evidence is clear, there can be no doubt as to whether those events occurred. Continue reading

King Jehoiachin in Babylon

 

Ishtar Gate

Top: Rictor Norton (CC BY SA 2.0) Wikimedia Commons. Bottom left: (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) British Museum. Bottom right: Jona Lendering (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) Livius.org

Post 7 – This week in #weeklybiblereadingarcheology, the exile of King Jehoichin (2 Kings 24 :12-17). At the British Museum is an official Babylonian record (Bottom left) which reads in part, “… he (Nebudchadnezzer) conquered the city and took the king (Jehoiachin) prisoner. He Continue reading