Where Did The Treasure Of King Solomon Go?

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According to the Bible, King Solomon obtained 666 talents of gold (22,679 kilograms or 25 U.S tons) in one year! In addition to gold, the king “…made the silver in Jerusalem as plentiful as the stones.” King Solomon was famous for his wealth in a way that his successors were not. Where did the immense wealth and treasure of King Solomon go? Continue reading

Tombs of the Persian Kings

The Tombs Of 4 Biblical Persian Kings

In modern Iran there is a remarkable ancient site that has special significance for Bible students. Carved into the face of a mountain near the ancient Persian capital of Persepolis (the Persians had 4 capitals), are the tombs of 4 ancient kings. These kings once ruled the greatest empire the world had known up until that time, the empire of the Medes and the Persians. At its height, an astounding 44% of the worlds population was ruled by Persia making it the largest empire in history by share of population. These kings styled themselves as the “King of Kings”. Four of these kings are mentioned in the Bible.  Continue reading

Shushan The Citadel With Bible In Hand

Shushan the Citadel or palace of the Persian King Ahasuerus features heavily in the Bible book of Esther. Ahasuerus is better to known to history as King Xerxes I, who presided over the empire of the Medes and the Persians when it was at its height. The ancient city of Shushan also known as Susa, is located on the edge of the modern Iranian city of Shush. It was excavated beginning in the 1890’s right through to the 1960’s. Unfortunately the site has been heavily damaged by looting, primitive archeological technique as well as by the war between Iraq and Iran, 1980-1988. Continue reading

How Was A Crucifixion Performed?

Nail through a heel bone contrasted with the usual depiction of a crucified victim's feet.

(Warning to readers: This article discusses subject matter which is necessarily unpleasant.)

Crucifixion is the most famous method of execution in history. Yet what was crucifixion exactly? How was it performed? Two archeological finds (one very recent) as well as contemporary historical accounts will illuminate the matter.

The Romans did not invent crucifixion. It seems they adopted a practise that was common in Persia. The Phoneticians were known to execute prisoners using crucifixion. Continue reading

Was this the home of Peter the Apostle?

Is This The Home Of The Apostle Peter?

(This is the last of three articles on the ancient city of Capernaum, Jesus’ “own city” (Matthew 9:1). The first article considered the question of why Jesus choose Capernaum as his base of operations for the first part of his ministry. The second article explored the fascinating results of over 100 years of archeological investigation into the ancient city, particularly its beautiful white synagogue. This final article examines what many claim to be the personal home of Peter the Apostle.)

Writing in the fourth century (circa 380 C.E), a wealthy woman named Egeria (or Etheria) from France or possibly Spain (opinions vary) visited the Bible lands on a religious pilgrimage. Upon visiting Capernaum, Jesus’ “own city” (Matthew 9:1), she wrote,

“And in Capernaum, what is more, the house of the prince of the Apostles has been transformed into a church, with its original walls still standing. Here the Lord healed the paralytic.” (Travels of Egeria)

Continue reading

Site of Capernaum in 1894

What Archeology Has Revealed About Capernaum, Jesus’ “Own City”

(This is the second of three articles on the ancient city of Capernaum, Jesus’ “own city” (Matthew 9:1). The first article examined the question of why Jesus choose Capernaum as his base of operations for the first part of his ministry. This article and the next will explore the fascinating results of over 100 years of archeological investigation into the ancient city.)

In 1894 when the Franciscan friars who purchased the site of ancient Capernaum walked through their new property, evidence of former habitation was everywhere (See photo above). Right up until the purchase, the Bedouin people had set their tents among the ruins. The remains of white limestone columns and elaborate Corinthian capitals gave silent testimony that a monumental structure had once stood there. But what structure? Would it prove to be a building known from the 4 Gospel books? In fact, it would! Continue reading

The site of ancient Capernaum

Why did Jesus move to Capernaum?

(This is the first of three articles on Capernaum, Jesus’ “own city” (Matthew 9:1). The first article will delve into Jesus’ possible connections to the city as well as the reasons why he left his residence in Nazareth to move there. The next two articles will examine what exciting things modern archeology has revealed about this most significant city in Jesus’ life and ministry.)

On a gentle hillside on the north-west shore of the Sea of Galilee stood the ancient city of Capernaum. The city was of modest size (by some estimates it’s first century population was between 1500 to 3000) and it did not survive down to modern times. Yet for a brief moment in the first century, this humble fishing community was the centre of the world. Continue reading